The Bible from 30,000 Feet Webcast Header

Flash Player version 9.0.124 or higher is required to view our high quality webcast.

Get Adobe Flash player

Listen

2, 3 John and Jude

Flight Plan:


Flight sixty-two over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will give a sky high view over three small but concise books, 2 & 3 John and Jude. While all three books have a different primary focus, all are written with the purpose to encourage the church to keep a strong biblical foundation. This study will take us through the importance of biblical discernment, the need to be in fellowship with other believers, as well as the vital need to keep strong in the faith. The key chapters to review are 2 & 3 John, and Jude.

Detailed Notes:

DESTINATION: 2 John


Second John has much in common with First John, including a warning about the danger of false teachers who deny the incarnation of Jesus Christ. John encourages the readers to continue walking in love but exhorts them to be discerning in their expression of love. He cautions them about receiving heretics into their homes or churches.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:


c. 85-95 A.D. - 2 John written


TRIP PLANNER:


Second John is addressed to an "elect lady" and her children. Some scholars believe the address should be taken literally to refer to a specific woman and her children, while others prefer to take it as a figurative description of a local church.


PLACES OF INTEREST:


No specific geographical places are mentioned in 2 John.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:


The Elect Lady -- This may have been a particular Christian woman and those who met in her house to worship God. If so, this is a more personal letter than First John.


FUN FACTS:


If the "chosen lady" is a figurative way of designating a particular church, then the "chosen sister" of v.13 would mean a different church, or "sister" congregation.



DESTINATION: 3 John


Third John was written because of reports from an Asian church that a man named Diotrephes has seized power, had rejected the teachers sent out by John, and was expelling those in his church who wanted to receive them.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:


c. 85-95 A.D. - 3rd John written


TRIP PLANNER:


Third John stresses the theme of enjoying and continuing to have fellowship with fellow believers, especially full-time Christian workers. The truth and servanthood of Gaius, who had shown hospitality to Johnís teachers, is contrasted with the error and selfishness of Diotrephes, whose arrogance and lack of hospitality were evidence of blindness to God.


PLACES OF INTEREST:


No specific geographical places are mentioned in 3 John.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:


Gaius -- He is spoken of as "the beloved," "walking in the truth," and doing "a faithful work."


Diotrephes -- Mentioned in as contentiously resisting the writer's authority and forbidding others from exercising the Christian hospitality which he himself refused to show.


Demetrius -- Nothing is known about him, other than Paul writes he is well spoken of.


DESTINATION: Jude


Jude wrote this letter in an effort to remind the church of the need for constant vigilance--to keep strong in the faith and to oppose heresy. He wrote to motivate Christians everywhere to action, to recognize the dangers of false teaching, to protect themselves and other believers, and to win back those who had already been deceived. He was writing against godless teachers who were saying that Christians could do as they pleased without fear of God's punishment.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:


c. 66-90 A.D. - Writing of the epistle of Jude


TRIP PLANNER:


Jude warns against false teachers and leaders who reject the lordship of Christ, undermine the faith of others, and lead them astray. He also warns against apostasy, the turning away from Christ. Those who do seek to know the truth in God's Word are susceptible to apostasy. Christians must guard against any false teachings that would distract them from the truth preached by the apostles and written in God's Word.


PLACES OF INTEREST:


No geographical places are mentioned in Jude.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:


Jude -- The epistle is titled as written by "Jude, a servant of Jesus Christ and a brother of James" (NRSV). If taken literally this means that the author claims to be a brother of Jesus, an attribution which is now increasingly considered as the most probable.


FUN FACTS:


The debate has continued over the author's identity as the apostle, the brother of Jesus, both, or neither. The author does not identify himself as an apostle, so some argue that he cannot be the Jude who is listed as one of the twelve. Others draw exactly the opposite conclusion, i.e., as Jude was an apostle, he would not have made such a claim on his own behalf. The writer is sometimes identified as another Jude, named as a brother of Jesus (Matthew 13:55; Mark 6:3).